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System Restore allows you to restore system settings and get your computer running properly again if something breaks after updates or installing new software.

Exploring Windows 8: How To Use System Restore In Windows 8

restoring-windows-8Windows 8, like previous versions of Windows has a feature called “System Restore”. System Restore allows you to restore your computer to a previous state quickly and easily without losing any of your files or personal settings. Sometimes when you install programs or drivers, they may affect some of the system settings and prevent other programs from working correctly. You can use System Restore to revert these settings back to their previous state.

Note: System Restore can not be used to back up your personal files, it only backs up settings and registry values.

Creating A Restore Point

Windows 8 will automatically create restore points for you every time major Windows updates have been applied, but you can also manually set a restore point yourself.

  1. First off we have to find the System Restore settings. There’s two ways to do this. The first is to simply type in “System Restore” in the Windows 8 Search bar.
    system-restore
    Alternatively open up the control panel and select “System and Security
    conteol-panel
  2. Then select “Advanced System Settings”
    advanced-system-settings
  3. Then click on the “System Protection Tab”
    navigating-system-restore
  4. You are now in the settings for System Restore.
  5. The first thing you will have to check is to see if your current hard drive has System Protection turned on. By default it should be, but if you want to enable it on another drive simply select it and then press configure.
    enabling-system-protection

You will now be able to turn on system protection and select how much of your hard drive you’re willing to allocate to system protection. You can also delete previous restore points.

6. To create a new restore point select “Create”.

create-restore-point-menu

7. You will now be asked to enter in a description so you can easily recognize when that restore point was created. The time and date are automatically added to each restore point so you don’t have to worry about that. When you’ve done that select “Create”.

naming-restore-point

8. Windows 8 will now automatically start to create the restore point for you.

-creating-restore-point

And when it’s all done you should hopefully get the following Window.

created-restore-point

Restoring From A Restore Point

  1. To restore from a restore point you will first have to navigate back to the Systems Protection tab as I showed previously. Once there you need to select System Restore
    system-restore-point
  2. This will then bring you into the System Restore Wizard. Click on “Next” to continue.
    restoring-windows-8
  3. You will now be asked to select which restore point you want to restore your system from.
    available-restore-points
  4. Once you’ve chosen a restore point, click on “Next” and you’ll find the following window asking you to confirm your choice.
    confirm-restore-point
  5. All you have to do now is click on “Finish” and Windows will automatically complete the restore for you.

Is System Restore Really Required?

The System Restore feature is quite handy if you’ve discovered that Windows isn’t working the way it should be after you recently installed updates or new programs. Sometimes programs can accidentally change settings that they shouldn’t have, so System Restore will allow you to restore these settings and get your computer running properly again. At such times, this feature can be a lifesaver.



  • http://www.facebook.com/people/Nick-Markov/100001914869159 Nick Markov

    I have tried the beta version of Windows System Restore. However, just like the previous steady state and the system restore in Windows 7; The System restore only restores SYSTEM FILES and some “Program Files”. I think I will still rely on RollBack Rx as the best alternative for my new Windows 8 laptop. RollBack Rx restores the entire PC in less then 10 seconds.

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